Suntrodden – Suntrodden III

Suntrodden – Suntrodden III

TWITTER: https://twitter.com/suntrodden

If you aren’t aware of Suntrodden yet, you may want to introduce yourself with their third album, Suntrodden III. The album consists of five songs, the first of which is titled “There’s A Place” and offers a gentle strolling tune with dreamy, mesmerizing, celestial vocals. This song is calming and relaxing. “There’s a Place” is the kind of song you could listen to while relaxing in your yard, or spending a day at the beach. As it draws to a close, you feel airy and relaxed. This leads you to their second track, “Pure.”

“Pure” felt more like a mellow, jam-band song; the kind of thing that would make great background music to a day in the sun with friends and drinks. The vocals on this track are heavier and less airy than the previous track, shaping the overall flavor of the song to something more playful and less astral.

“Moonflower,” the third track on the album, takes you on a ride to a new set of sounds. Opening on a piano solo, the song lulls you into its world before unleashing a collection of instruments while taking you on a ride through a dream-like state. The vocals on this song stood out more than the vocals on the previous song, making them seem more important. They drift along with the music and carry you to each oncoming transition. As the song draws near the end, the tone warms and becomes more urgent, drawing you to the following track.
Track four, “Never Again,” opens strong and offers the right amount of energy following the ending to “Moonflower.” The vocals blend with the guitar to almost form one sound in a way that draws you in. “Never Again” would make a wonderful background to a warm, summer day at the park.
The final song on Suntrodden III, “The End (Haunt Me)” opens with calming, soothing music and vocals that felt almost like a lullaby for adults. Ghostly tones ramp up as they introduce you to the loving vocals. The vocals bring you in and leave you feeling an uncanny tension before picking up pace and following through to a fulfilling ending.

With music that draws from Beach House, Radio Head and Elliott Smith, you might not expect a band as unique and dreamy. Though I enjoyed the entire album a great deal, I felt the most entranced by “Moonflower.” It feels like the kind of song that will continue to travel with you for months, or even years to come.

Suntrodden is one man, Erik Stephansson, from Atlanta, who brings his own brand of musical sound combined with inspiration from the Beach Boys with hints of Radiohead and Nirvana. This is one of three albums from Mr. Stephansson and I would expect that we would see many more to come. After hearing Suntrodden III, I plan to pick up Suntrodden II and Suntrodden as soon as I can.

Overall, I enjoyed this album a great deal I give it 9 out of 10 stars.

FACEBBOK: https://www.facebook.com/suntrodden/

Sarah Scharnweber Legge

Drew Davidsen – Out of the Blue

Drew Davidsen – Out of the Blue

PRIMARY URL: https://nembleu.wixsite.com/drewdavidsen

Songwriter, vocalist, and guitarist Drew Davidsen’s “Out of the Blue” is a fine single release from the performer’s debut album A Good Life and finds him confident and nuanced right out of the gate. His guitar work gets ample chance to be noticed during the performance, but this isn’t just a vehicle for his instrumental prowess. “Out of the Blue” is a well produced and surging AOR rock track with a high musical pedigree that builds dramatic tension from the outset and carries listeners along on a wave of energy. He proves to be quite a serviceable vocalist capable of inhabiting a lyric without ever sabotaging its potential. This is a solid and quite pleasing bit of rock songwriting without any of the big footed musical heroics common to less nuanced practitioners of the genre; Davidsen is clearly a cut above the pack and shows that with every line in this performance.

Like most top flight musicians, Davidsen’s musical journey began early in life and there’s certainly a sense in the song of a lifetime’s worth of lessons bearing creative fruit. Davidsen’s music and vocals alike will strike many listeners as the sound of an artistic force unleashed and, despite the commercial nature of the material, he never strikes a false note throughout the song. The song is off to the races after a brief preamble and maintains a steady line of attack throughout with the exception of a brief instrumental break. It’s further telling of his confidence level that Davidsen begins with the chorus; it’s a relatively audacious move that signals a performer putting his best foot forward and having the ear to know he has a great track. The same confidence persists throughout the duration of the song. His guitar work enters the picture at the right places, but never announces itself with chest-beating overkill. Instead, Davidsen wisely works his playing into the song’s fabric until it is all but indistinguishable from the other fine playing surrounding it.

Much of the other fine musicianship heard on this song comes from its rhythm section. They are an unobtrusive presence in the mix, but there’s little question that the engine room of this configuration provides much of the track’s impetus from the outset. They particularly excel at carrying off the fine chorus and you’ll find yourself living for those moments even after a single hearing. Drew Davidsen’s “Out of the Blue” covers familiar territory in popular song, but there’s no question that he’s followed the primary mandate of any material like this – bring something of yourself to the performance so it has a transformative effect. If Davidsen has succeeded with nothing else, he’s done that splendidly. It works well as a taste of his full length album as well and promises anyone ready to purchase that release an entertaining time well worth every cent.

INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/drew_davidsen/

Lance Wright

Kama Ruby – “Mistake” single

Kama Ruby – “Mistake” single

FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/kamaruby/

I’ve not heard of Kama Ruby before. I’m always on the look-out for interesting and effective female performers, so I feel that I’ve been missing out on something worthwhile. This single features a couple new songs from the artist in anticipation of her third album. Kama Ruby’s sound has a lot of nods to jazz traditions, but doesn’t seem tied to that type of sound. She manages to work wonders in a musical zone that wanders around it. I guess you could say that she does that in a similar way to Steely Dan, but this doesn’t sound like Steely Dan. It just occupies a similar jazz-inspired territory.

With “Mistake,” Ruby creates her own version of a Moby tune. There is a lot of real emotion built into the lyrics and her vocal delivery on this version helps to realize that. The music here seems to flirt with jazz, but it has more of a tendency toward electronic music.

Of course, if you set this version alongside the original, it’s positively pure jazz. I tend to think that the electronic elements here are more of an homage to the sound of Moby’s version of the song. They do bring a different depth and character to it when paired with those jazzy components.

The other cut of this single is “Treasure Island.” While Ruby didn’t write the song, (Jane Getz and Jon Strider did) I think that aspect of this song deserves some attention. In fact, I think the lyrical aspect is particularly impressive. The song is based on the Robert Louis Stevenson book at its heart. The clever twist to it, though, is that those references are laid out as a metaphor for more personal real life situations. I don’t think I’ve ever heard an original version of this, assuming there is one, but based on those lyrics I’d be interested in checking it out.

Musically “Treasure Island” is generally a mellower piece of music. The vocals are clear and soaring. Ruby shows that she has the pipes to really deliver some stunning vocal work. While I prefer the first song to this one, there are certainly selling points to this one.

I’m definitely interested in hearing the whole new album from Kama Ruby. I find the sounds here have piqued my interest. I’ll be looking into her earlier releases, too. She has a lot of talent, and I like her style.

TWITTER: https://twitter.com/kamaruby

Mary Angela Tobin

Sam Green and the Time Machine – Which Way Left?

Sam Green and the Time Machine – Which Way Left?

YOU TUBE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=60sVwfxePOA

Since he first began publically channeling his creativity in the 6th grade, Sam Green has been putting himself out there as an artist in a way only those devoted to such things truly do. His musical work reflects the same principle. His recordings with the band Time Machine are among the most lively works one will encounter both on the indie and mainstream scene and there’s a fearlessness married to playfulness in everything he touches and there’s an equally skillful thrust to the performances on his latest outing Which Way Left? reaching far beyond the yen of dilettantes and hacks who lack heart/ There’s an abundance of heart on this release. Fourteen songs might strike some as a bit much, but none of the tracks are long winding epics lacking rhyme or reason or simply throwing things against the wall in hopes they stick.

“Dandeong Ranges” shows off that point with utter clarity. In lesser hands, this song would have surely been weighed down with too much in an effort to convey points and story that Green and his accompanying musicians manage to get across with minimal playing and lean, economical lyrics. This is the sort of song that is obviously intensely personal, yet speaks across the artist’s personal experience to something we can all touch. The acoustic guitar is particularly strong. Those same qualities continue on the album’s second track “Eli”. This isn’t an invocation of place like we heard on the first song and, instead, sounds ripped from Green’s soul thanks to a riveting vocal reaching far beyond the relatively common subject. It’s even more impressive if it isn’t autobiographical because it sure does sound like the inspiration for the song is as close to Green as the mic in front of him. It’s even more impressive considering his voice is far rom the typical vocal we appreciate, but the tone and texture is ideal for the material.

“Google Me” might seem, based on title alone, to be a more light hearted affair, but Green’s songwriting uses it as a jumping off point for something much more personal. This is a performance full of longing and the instruments reflect this as well as the vocal. It unfolds slowly and deliberately, but it sounds organic and never premeditated. “Harry Ginagain” is one of the album’s most creative efforts with an almost child-like quality in its vocal melody and the simple rhymes. It is relatively simplistic in its lyric content compared to earlier tracks but “I Want to Live in Australia” is much more than a mere paean to Green’s homeland. There’s a bit of understated irony in his extolling the people of his homeland as basically unblemished souls, but one can never be sure listening to the song that he isn’t entirely serious. There is a great deal of love in the song and sifting through its possibilities is much of its fun. The final song on Which Way Left?, “’Round and Around”, might seem to traffic in somewhat trite sentiments, but they have the undeniable ring of truth and he delivers the lyric with far more light and whimsy than anything else we’ve heard before. Rarely do releases come as well rounded and complete as this album.

SPOTIFY: https://play.spotify.com/track/5r90W76lHtXYDGWKjvo0Hp?play=true&utm_source=open.spotify.com&utm_medium=open

Dale Butcher

Paul Kloschinsky- Crime of Passion

Paul Kloschinsky- Crime of Passion

FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/Paul-Kloschinsky-SingerSongwriter-176927601286/

The new studio album from Paul Kloschinsky, Crime of Passion, marks the sixth full length release from a Canadian born singer/songwriter whose talent level equals, if not exceeds, anything else that’s come from him yet. Kloschinsky, to a certain extent, openly sports his influences but they are never so overt as to seem gaudy and never lose their ability to reach the audience. He brings some unusual instrumentation to bear throughout the songs but, once again, it is never saw out of place as to strike some sort of incongruous note during the musical proceedings. Crime of Passion is largely centered around his acoustic guitar work and vocals, but the additional instrumental sounds help fill out his canvas with restrained and powerfully artful swaths of color. This is a fantastic performer who doesn’t come into the listener’s space beating on his chest. Instead, these are considered and well crafted slices of life in musical form.

He begins the release in fine fashion with the track “I’m Still Waiting”. This, in some respects, is a musical tale of abiding desire and its acoustic slant is no obstacle to Kloschinsky putting over the material with great energy and forcefulness. The tone of his guitar work has a slightly darker edge than what listeners will find on much of the album’s material, but it never fails to entertain. This remains an important focal point of Kloschinsky’s material. Even at his most intelligent and thoughtful, the material on Crime of Passion exhibits an undeniable musicality pulling listeners in with each performance. The album’s title track “Crime of Passion” expands on the intensity of the opener and his a sparse style that focuses listeners even more intently on the track’s message and Kloschinsky’s singing. He doesn’t have a classical sound as a singer, but there’s much in his singing approach that shows such merits cannot always be measured by conventional standards. “Soothe Me” is, nominally, a love song of sorts, but often times the lyrics show off intriguing subtexts we don’t often hear with this sort of material. Kloschinsky could certainly turn his hands to a simpler, straight forward expression of such sentiments, but life’s experiences are never that tidy and his songwriting reflects this accordingly.

“House on the Hill” is one of the album’s centerpiece moments and may prompt some listeners to recall similarly titled tracks and lyrics from artists as diverse as Hank Williams Sr. and Bruce Springsteen. Kloschinsky’s narrative gifts come to the fore here and he distinguishes himself as a lean, economical storyteller who never neglects to invest such compositions with strong musical backing never threatening to overshadow either the lyrics or vocal. Another of the album’s finest moments, “Gates of Heaven”, presents itself as a track very much in a tradition, but one of its strongest qualities is the way his personality clearly emerges from a long-standing song type. There’s much to praise about the passion in his delivery here, but he lets the lyric and music do the work without ever throwing things out of balance. Crime of Passion has much to offer fans of the singer/songwriter genre and will likely stand for some time to come as one of Paul Kloschinsky’s best recordings.

I-TUNES: https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/paul-kloschinsky/id288669129

Ed Price

Kazyak – ‘Happy Camping’

Kazyak – ‘Happy Camping’

URL: http://kazyak.com/

Happy Camping of Kazyak band is a treat to the listener’s ears and give them a reason to smile and be happy while soothing with relaxing musical beats.

The Twin Cities Indie rock band, Kazyak is coming up with its new album release ‘Happy Camping’. Talking it in the conventional sense, a camping is happy when the camper is comfortable and contended and is experiencing everything as he or she has planned. The album tries to capture that happy and contented feel through its tracks.

The season that the tracks replicate is spring when it’s time for the flowers to bloom and there is no sign of darkness anywhere on the surface. Capturing the momentum of the season and the brilliance of the spirited flowers, the tracks are sizzling and entertaining and thus is able to captivate the attention of the listeners at one go.

Peter Grey (guitar), Andy Wolfe (guitar), Nick Grewe (drums), Lana Bolin (bass), and Pat Hayes (piano, synthesizer) – the members of the band, have their own distinctive indie folk roots and are blessed with great musical understanding. Together, they are known for creating marvelous and excellent musical masterpiece, which is just a treat for the listeners.

One of the lovely singles from the album ‘Happy Camping’, “When I Lived In Carolina” is a testament to the excellence of the band. The soft, folk song with all the elements in place and the heart-touching lyrics, will never fail to woo with its melody and charm.

Kazyak is popular for the firm tweaking of guitars and this has lent them a unique name in the musical industry. This strumming provides a soothing experience to the listeners. Using the same in their new album, the band is ready to provide its listeners some always entertaining and lively tracks for their playlist.

The sound used by the band typically evokes a type of Experimental Americana style. It uses the soft and slow flow of the music to reach the ears and gradually make a path to the hearts of the listeners. With richness in its style and the flawless concept that it has adopted, the band is sure to reach a great height in the musical industry. However, as for now, it has already mesmerized a huge chunk of listeners with its soothing, soft and inventive musical approach.

Lending you a hand to overcome the dark phase of your life and introduce you with a new ray of happy life, the songs of ‘Happy Camping’ is surely something that you will want to listen over and over again.
Having a detailed and core understanding of the requirements of the listeners and knowing the right path to reach out to them, Kazyak has successfully managed to create its own unique impression in the market. Giving you the opportunity to unhook a new life and an overwhelming emotion, the songs aptly offer a unique balance between music and sentiments.

‘Happy Camping’ tracks are the best way to provide the listeners a new way to begin a happy expedition of their life. Deeply grounded in nature, the music and inspiration of the band have a refreshing touch of innovative music coupled with the brilliant flow of emotions.

FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/kazyaking

Joseph Rothschild

Lexie Rose drops hot new single

Lexie Rose drops hot new single

SPOTIFY: https://play.spotify.com/album/6Y2merUAyJ4MGM5lI2hhyv?play=true&utm_source=open.spotify.com&utm_medium=open

Lexie Rose is a new young singer on the scene, she’s only seventeen, but she’s been recording since she was thirteen. She soon became popular on the L.A. club circuit, regularly playing popular spots, including The Echo, Hotel Café, Genghis Cohen, and the legendary Troubadour. She most recently played the prestigious Play Like A Girl Showcase in Los Angeles. Lexie complements her own headline gigs as keyboardist and acoustic guitarist in Night Talks, her brother’s alt rock band that just released its debut album, In Dreams. This single “Wrong” is produced by Max Allyn.

The core values of this track aren’t restricted to the club circuit by any means. It seems to cover every genre from candy pop to smooth jazz. This has a diversity that crosses over on many levels of radio accessibility, instead of a one-dimensional approach. And that comes without hearing anything else by Lexie Rose. These values can mostly be found in the lyrics, which invite the opportunity to apologize but it not being the right thing to do after all. This is something that takes a maturity level not often heard from such a youthful perspective. But that’s just some of the magic she’s weaving.

The rich texture of her voice is also something that comes out mature as well, but she still has a long way to go. This is something young artists will always have going for them. By the time they haven’t even been at it long, they sound like they’ve been doing it all their life. And if this song is any evidence, then she’ll go far with more of the same. It’s a case of not fixing what isn’t broken. You get that within a few bars, and it’s an honestly that gets more required over the years. It’s just something she seems to have fully nailed on the only track I’ve heard. It instantly intrigues to hear more of her.

It’s about giving those second chances and falling short in such decisions to want to mend things. A love song but also a catchy tune about something everyone can relate to, and how time waits for no one concerning mistakes. There’s nothing heavy-handed about it. Everything falls into place as she comes alive in the last run of the chorus, after building up to it nice and slowly. It’s totally groovy on the way toward the ending, which helps follow it with ease. It flows at a mesmerizing-pace with a hypnotic delivery. Almost like pondering before concluding being “Wrong.”

This single should entice her fan base for the EP, which if the rest is anything like this, should turn heads from many other directions and hit targets not even aimed for. Exposure is one thing, but delivering a quality product is everything in front of, and behind it. This is when your fans are ready but the rest of the world awaits, and getting this out there is the main objective. It’s the first step in the process of what sounds like will be a great debut EP release behind a well-chosen single to prepare her audience and the rest of the world for what’s to come. She has chosen a most-infectious track to start with.

TWITTER: https://twitter.com/lexierosemusic?lang=en

Larry Toering

Big Paul E

Big Paul E

FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/bigpaulemusic/

A former member of Menace to Society and Smoove Villains, Big Paul E has been around the block when it comes to the hip hop scene. In ’95 he decided it was time for him to go solo and from then on out he’s been churning out rhymes including 2010’s SEEDS which will be re-released this coming year, and his current mixtape Kill the R.I.G.H.T. People. While his time spent as part of formative hip hop groups has given him the foundation to continue his career, it is the adversities that have shaped his willpower to succeed in life. He’s overcome every curve ball thrown his way. I wasn’t familiar with Big Paul E until I went back and looked him up after hearing his new mixtape. But it helped, so the songs got a good outing once I did that. It’s almost like stepping back into time, but not quite, as the songs are all over the place. But they’re also well-grounded and don’t get boring. This is just the right blend between old and new hip hop. Having been around the scene this long, it works on both levels. All the songs are fused together with perfection, some of it explicit, but not all of it is. And the title cut looks harder than it sounds, which fools in just the right way, once you listen.

“Bad Santa” leads it off with an explicit rap, but it’s only mildly explicit. This is essentially a show-jam with a lot of comedy going for it, and it’s a must start for the track list on this mixtape. It has the most accessible appeal to it, even though explicit, it’s what fans want. The rap deals with talking behind backs and rumors getting around. This is a good solid opener, but everything stays in alignment as the rest of the tracks go. It stands out well on its own though, and plays like a hit single. But what makes a hit these days is an elusive thing. This still has whatever that might be, completely going for it.

“Kill The R.I.G.H.T. People” is the second track, and it’s much more positive than it looks. It’s all about bringing people together, instead of dividing. It seems all the wrong people get the axe, and Big Paul E sets a lot that straight in his lyrics on this. Speaking out against all the “nonsense” in the world today, and leaving a positive message behind over it. He clearly wants the people to get it right and kill with kindness, not weapons. Anyone can relate to this, if they break it out and soak it up. Where all these tracks hold their own, this one comes off as the most important message between these tracks.

My favorite pick is the next track in the mix, with “Dig A Bigga Ditch” making the biggest impact for me. I kept it on loop more than the others, as I found it to be the catchiest tune, regardless of the lyrics. This is music after all, and it makes just as big points as the vocal work on display. But if I had to pick a close second it would be “Kleer” feat Erin. The beats on it are the most satisfying to be found among the tracks, and it’s also one of the grooviest moments on KTRP. There isn’t a reason I can find for hip hop lovers not to partake in what Big Paul E is up to lately.

DATPIFF: http://www.datpiff.com/Big-Paul-E-Kill-The-Right-People-mixtape.827041.html

Mike Tabor

Ozzie Melendez

Ozzie Melendez

FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/OzMelendez

Behind every hit song is a team of talented writers, producers and studio musicians. One of them being Ozzie Melendez. He has worked behind the scenes with artists such as Jessica Simpson and Marc Anthony. Now he’s switching gears and focusing on his own thing, a style of music that fuses together the ways of Jamaican dancehall, Salsa, Reggaeton and pop by way of his latest single “Camaleón.”
Ozzie has performed all over the world as a vocalists, composer, director and trombonist on Broadway shows, commercials, and TV shows. All-of his work has put him on the top of the “must work with list” that has garnered him studio time with some of the biggest hitmakers of today.

In the case of what he’s doing with his latest single here, there is a lot to explore between the two languages he speaks and the fact that he recorded this in Spanish, as well as English. Let’s not be brief about that, because it crosses over into both cultures perfectly because of that move. And it will only put more artists onto him that might seek his production and songwriting assistance. That’s an easy guess after hearing it and a couple of previous tracks in the shape of “Por La Vereda” and “Ay Mujer” which may or may not give more insight to him as a recording artist. If you’re Spanish speaking it will have more impact though, as they’re sang in his native tongue. But getting past them to the main course is what the review is all about, and “Camaleón” is just the right ticket if you’re looking up his alley for something to dance to. If not, you can still get a groove on just listening to it. Lovers of Salsa, Flamenco and others will be able to fully appreciate a track like this being chosen for a single release. It goes the distance in every way, to bring people together on the floor and tear it up, especially in the hot summer time, when it is best celebrated.

When else do you break out the jams and start dancing than in the summer heat, it’s a very outdoorsy vibe all the way through it, so it comes out at just the right time. It runs for 3:45 of pure Latin spirit to wash all over you and your dance partner, or just your ears only on the headphones will do as well. It fits every intended purpose and more, and I can hear this ringing out of the doors of the clubs and even pool houses of the backyards of the suburbs. It has that air of gathering for parties with or without live music being presented. It can be a smash inside or outside that way.

There is definitely-a place for Ozzie Melendez in the musical mainstream somewhere, and he’ll get there if the forces stay aligned with him, but he’s already proven himself a thousand times over, and that’s no secret. But if there’s a goal beyond just coming out to play instead of produce or back someone else, it is yet to be seen via releasing singles. A full-length EP or album awaits, but that could be off on the horizon somewhere after this and more singles are released. It’s up to him to follow up in that fashion or not, but why start something and not go the distance. But a very good start it is, that’s for sure.

INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/oz_melendez/

Todd Bauer

Danny Gee-Goju

Danny Gee-Goju

FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/dannygee.goju

A “wicked sense of humor” can come in many forms, and it’s no stranger to music. Danny Gee has one and more, but it’s not for the entire family though, and that’s alright with me. Because you get more than you bargain for in the music than anything else, it survives on its own merit. I can admit the album is not for everyone, but I wasn’t born yesterday and if it’s good there is no use calling it bad. But there are some problems, and they deal with the fact that even though there is a great deal of culture on display, it may not appeal to the entire global market. However, that’s the only observation of it and the artist himself. You’ll come away with a smile if you’re so inclined to listen to some of what he’s traying to get across on this, but then you’ll already get him if you’re already aware. And if you are, you’ll already be familiar with what he can do, with a point to mention being the guitar work on “Power Of Love/Lust” by the time you get to it. One of the absolute goodies to be found between the cracks on this outstanding CD, lies in this track. It smacks right in the middle of the set of wonderful adult-themed stuff, which is followed by a short warning message about sex. You have-to have a sense of humor or this won’t travel into your wheelhouse.

So, putting that out of the picture in this review, it’s smooth sailing for the music lovers. But just to mention one more less desirable moment, the next track “Whore” could on the other hand be a little much. But “nobody’s perfect” either, and you “might even need a pint after that.” No holding back at any point unless you can tune that out, so don’t expect there to be, until the end, where that changes for the only time. You hear about “the Soho Flasher” on “Son Of A Bitch” where he finds himself in front of the judge. This is a traditional reggae cut with one of the more enjoyable stories on the album. I got it anyway, but maybe that’s pushing it too hard on the people, I don’t care as-long as it is good and I like it within my own taste, I’ll share that opinion on any subject. It can be one reason why I give it upper marks, just as I some other comedy and spoken word entertainers. “Pig Of A Man” retains the wicked sense of humor you’ll have to respect or not even listen to Danny Gee in the first place, but give it a spin and hear for yourself. He goes back and forth with his lady, over a saloon style piano and string section behind it. This supersedes any conflict of interest I could possibly have with the lyrics. And it’s a good thing it comes before one of the previously mentioned parts(which the tracks play like).

“Gigolo” and “Geraldine” also go through socio-political moments worth investigating. They both groove with the best the be heard here. If you really like it, you’ll break out with laughter in every single song, and that is putting it mildly. He gets put in his place on the latter, and the former sports some of the finer musical skills of his/theirs. The vocal sparring is a treat, and so is the comedy on this. “The Way The Cookie Crumbles” isn’t the highest point but it’s still funny. And it’s not all so heavy handed when the final track “Thank You God” almost makes up for all-of the detractions you may find. Funny ones they are at that.

SOUNDCLOUD: https://soundcloud.com/danny-gee-goju

Mike Tabor