The Riot – ‘Love Makes Me Crazy’

The Riot – ‘Love Makes Me Crazy’

FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/herestheriotofficial/

This band is very upbeat in this song. It catches your attention with its thundering lyrics and the nice voice of its lead singer. Also the where the song pauses in the lyrics and includes mostly instrumentals is really on par. The cover photo of the song is on par too. It is a nod to the genre. The photo first draws your attention to an arm with a black leather bracelet and the black guitar that is slung underneath. Then your eye moves passed the arm to a torso of the owner of the arm who is wearing a black leather belt. The viewer can only see the torso of the person, his guitar, and his all black ensemble. It must be a picture of Paris Tompkins, the lead singer and the songwriter for the group. He moved to Los Angeles to begin his music career and led him to join The Riot; the band is currently still located in LA. The band is of the Indie Rock persuasion and that really comes out in their hit song, Love Makes Me Crazy.

Love Makes Me Crazy begins with a slow guitar introduction. Then the sound of the guitar dims a bit and in comes accompanying vocals and drums. This works to really pull the listener in fast. Love makes me crazy is as the title suggests, a love song. “Oh my lord, woe is me, the light’s blown out and I can’t see,” is one of the more powerful lines in the song. Along with “I’m already not the sanest man, but love makes me crazy even more than I am.” Both of these lines really define the song and make it stand apart from other love music. These lyrics also reveal the beat and the sound of the song, with five word sentences making the song catchy. The music picks up with these lines and is joined by clapping to make for a tune that stands out even more. The song focuses on these lines for awhile then moves to the idea of the location of the subject in the song getting out of where ever they are stuck at. But he argues back. His reply isn’t that he is settling, but merely that he cannot get out, because of circumstances. Which really is an additional interesting add on to the song and it’s plot, is he not leaving this town ultimately because the love of his life is there?

About halfway through the song there is a part where there is mostly yelling which adds to the stress relieving felling of the song. The ending of the song it really slows down with added laughter, claps and snaps and creates a nice sounding conclusion. It really eases out at the finish. This song really encapsulates love. Especially with the lines that stand out. Love does truly make a person do things that are out of the ordinary for them and perhaps just out of the norm for anyone in general. The song really drives this point home and makes for great listening too.

AMAZON: https://www.amazon.com/Love-Makes-Crazy-Heres-Riot/dp/B01F2O5RI8

Maxine Summers

Marc Daniels – Summer Song

Marc Daniels – Summer Song

URL: https://www.marcdanielscountry.com/

I never really knew that I liked country music until very recently. Lately I’ve been discovering a number of country acts that I really like. It might be really appropriate and advantageous, then that I got to hear “Summer Song” from Marc Daniels now. The timing must have really lined up well.

The vocal performance on this song is right on the mark. The cut has a nice moving groove to it, too. It rocks with the best of them. This stands right up to any of the modern country music of acts like Little Big Town quite well. This should be a hit right alongside their stuff. I should mention that they are one of my recent discoveries that I really like. So, that says a lot. Apparently this song isn’t brand new. It was released on Daniels’ first album, “The Starting Line.” That disc came out in the summer of 2016. I guess that means that the “summer” Daniels was talking about is a year ago. It doesn’t matter because the message and the sound are timeless and work well year after year.

Marc Daniels is based in the Spokane, Washington area. I’m guessing that it’s not a hot bed of country music. You wouldn’t know it from hearing this artist. His sound feels authentic and really sells the listener on the mood and the tone. Of course, to fully understand where this musical talent originated, you need to take into consideration the fact that Daniels grew up surrounded by many musicians and a rich musical heritage in his family. That heritage, along with a musical education including piano lessons that he started when he was in grade school contribute to his sound.

He lists a diverse set of influences. To some degree you can hear a lot of that in his music, too. Tim McGraw and Garth Brooks are the obvious ones on his short list. You can definitely hear the impact those have made on his sound. His music should appeal to fans of both of those artists. The list includes Pink Floyd and Def Leppard, though. Those two aren’t so obvious, but do show up in the rocking sound of Daniels’ music. I suppose it should be noted that Daniels bills his music as country rock, rather than rock inspired country music. I can only base my assessment on this one song, but to me, this lands more on the country end of that equation. Still, it’s a matter of degrees, so that’s really only so relevant.

Over the years Daniels has played a lot of gigs. That means people all over the country have had the chance to experience his sound. Since his album is now a year old, plenty of other people have gotten to know his music via that release. For those who haven’t heard him before in one of those other ways, “Summer Song” presents another opportunity to hear this artist. Give it a try. You are likely to find something new to enjoy.

INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/marcdanielscountry/?hl=en

Diane Hill

Bunny Sigler – “Angel Eyes”

Bunny Sigler – “Angel Eyes”

FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/BunnySigler/

I could very easily believe that this song was recorded in the 1930s or the 1940s. (There are reasons for that beyond the obvious. I’ll get to those shortly.) It seems like something one of the crooners would have done in the golden era of the crooners. I suppose Harry Connick, Jr. has plied a good amount of his musical trade within much of that same soundscape over the years since his debut. This sounds like something he might have created in a lot of ways. Of course, Connick always seemed to be deeply influenced by Frank Sinatra. He even played the Sinatra part in the remake of “Oceans 11.” It all comes into focus when you realize that Sinatra is actually one of the musicians who recorded this song over the years.

Regarding Sigler, he is a Philadelphia native discovered while performing at Atlantic City’s Ambassador Hotel and has earned multiple Grammy nominations while selling millions of records in the intervening years. His work with producers Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff remain the high water mark of his commercial success and those releases went a long way towards earning him his nickname of “Mr. Emotion”. That penchant for heartfelt performances continues with his version of “Angel Eyes” – despite the differences in style, Sigler hailing from a soul/R&B tradition rather than the jazz ballad style this tune is cast in, he inhabits its words and arrangement like the song was written for him all along.

In fact, the song appears on Sinatra’s “Frank Sinatra Sings Only for the Lonely” album from 1958. Eight years later he released a live version on “Sinatra at the Sands.” The song feels like it was written for him, but it had actually been recorded by a number of other artists over the years starting with Herb Jeffries in 1947.

I don’t think that I’ve actually heard Bunny Sigler before. He’s been a force in the music business for over 40 years, though, so I’m not sure how I missed him. Maybe I’ve heard him in the past but didn’t realize it. Still, apparently Sigler’s career has been based in R&B music. I’ve never really been a big fan of that kind of stuff, so I guess it probably makes sense if this is the first time I’ve heard him. The mix of piano, voice, and string weaving this song into full life has a lush, inviting quality that will affect anyone who listens.

The music business has clearly changed since the time when this song was originally released. It’s changed a lot since Sigler’s debut. It seems that people aren’t all that interested in music with emotion and melody like they used to be. In a lot of ways, the beat is king these days. Even when listeners like music, they wind up streaming it instead of buying it. It will be interesting to see how this does. It would be a real breath of fresh air for Bunny Sigler’s cover of “Angel Eyes” to really sell in this era. This is a performance of rare distinction resounding with all the class and style you would expect, but also full of immense musical quality.

CD BABY: https://store.cdbaby.com/cd/bunnysigler215

Diane Hill

Sojo Mojo

Sojo Mojo

FACEBOOK: https://fr-ca.facebook.com/pg/TheSojoMojo/about/

The idea driving Sojo Mojo, a project conceived by three movers in the music industry, Steve Bauer, Jim Petersen, and John Burke, is that bands and artists with any sort of real staying power are subject to staleness eventually because of a lack of vocal variety and imagination. Their remedy for this is Sojo Mojo, a project where Jim Petersen’s songwriting is served by a battery of distinctly different female voices therefore giving the songwriting and performances needed spice that they might otherwise lack. The first two songs that are the fruits of their ambition, “Something to Smile About” and “Just Don’t Ever Tell Me”, do an excellent job of illustration the exciting possibilities behind this approach and give a spotlight moment to the considerable talents of young singer Gabriella Kreuz, but these are fundamentally excellent songs that are well served by the singing and production alike.

“Something to Smile About” is arguably the more conventional of the two and that’s a likely reason why it was chosen as the lead single. The track has a bright bounce and a hook laden chorus that’s impossible to ignore. It’s a pure pop song and the transitions are invariably predictable, but what put this track over the top ultimately is two-fold and related. Kreuz’s immensely charismatic vocals never have to reach for effect. There’s no sense, at any point, of her pandering to the listener. Instead, she knows what she’s doing from the outset and you find yourself willing to trust her as the song’s singer/ The simple poetry of the song, as well, is a strength. Despite decades of similar songs and formulas, there’s no sure method for capturing the universal in a way that makes listeners tune in once more.

The second track “Just Don’t Ever Tell Me” comes across in a much different way. The bass line is a definite musical highlight on this performance and has weaves its fat thread throughout the entirety of the tune. The lyrics are a little darker, but more sarcastic in a fashion, than what the project explored with its first song, but Kreuz keeps us entertained with an equally sassy and skeptical vocal. Her gifts as a singer don’t announce themselves with trumpets in this setting. Instead, she proves to be a great follower of the groove and, on this song, she distinguishes herself in a much different way than we heard on the earlier track. Both songs never overextend the listener’s attention and, instead, retain a razor sharp focus that persists for the duration of both tracks. Sojo Mojo has the potential and talents behind it to become an individual force within the music world and the outside the box thinking propelling its vision is obviously served, already, by top notch songwriting and powerhouse performances.

TWITTER: https://twitter.com/thesojomojo

Shannon Cowden

Weatherboy – Self Titled

Weatherboy – Self Titled

FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/WeatherBoyMusicOfficial/

The first release from John Walquist and Ragnar Rosinkranz’s project Weatherboy is a self-titled ten song collection with a surprising amount of thematic unity and tight focus. These are only two of the album’s defining features. Their fearless strip mining of quasi-orchestral pop and re-inventing it into something more organic and modern befitting their own inner voice and our modern era. Perhaps unsurprisingly considering Walquist’s penchant for surfing, the lyrical content is rife with sea imagery, but this is songwriting that never succumbs to cliché. The production is first class and largely disdains a lot of post production gimmickry; when those moments come, however, Weatherboy maintain a level of taste that keeps the songs above water. Often, when we think of pop music, we imagine utterly disposable fare like dance tracks or so forth, but Weatherboy serve up pop music of an entirely different sort. This is pop music capable of great intimacy while still enlivening the spirit with an entertaining listening experience.

They’ve enlisted the, perhaps, unlikely help of iconic guitarist Phil Keaggy for this release and his presences graces every track. His steadily creative hand on guitar brings a lot to the album opener, but it’s the comprehensive approach Weatherboy takes that really wins the day for performances like the opener “Got a Good Thing”. There’s some strong drumming driving this along and it is recorded in such a way you can’t help but pay attention. The incorporation of brass lines in both this song and the second “Great Great Life” are vivid splashes of color over otherwise already vibrant sonic canvases The exuberance heard in both songs doesn’t sound forced at all and they are a great tandem to begin the album with, but things don’t slide from there. The next song “Riding on the Wind” has some strong acoustic guitar and begins with a slightly folky vibe before multi-track and backing vocals come in and the song transitions into a jangling march. This bit of forcefully ethereal pop adds more elements and peaks during the song’s final half.

“Goodbye LA” is a delightfully woozy and upbeat pop confection with some revealing personal lyrics and understated guitar from Keaggy snaking its way through the mix. The horns are, once again, great touch here and the song ends in a particularly lovely fashion. “Bennett” is one of the album’s finest songs thanks to the how successful the wide net it casts proves to be. There’s a lot going on here musically, but the vocal stands out so much – the singing careens from one passage to with the next with a keen ear for the complex composition’s needs. “All Your Fault” is another musical zenith on this debut and shows a fiercer nature than what we’ve been accustomed to thus far on the release. The album’s final songs “Home Fire” and “Full Bloom” are much different than the aforementioned eight tracks and bring Weatherboy’s album to a satisfying conclusion. This is a masterful debut with tremendous ambition and sounds like the beginning of something special should they choose to pursue it.

INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/WeatherboyMusic/

Craig Bowles

HYTS

HYTS

SOUNDCLOUD: https://soundcloud.com/hytsmusic/exoplanet-hyts

In the spirit of musical justice (as I find is severely lacking these days), I gave this latest CD from HYTS a good and proper listen. Not only did I not hate it, but I actually kind of fell in love with it, and subsequently (and individually) the duo in the process.

First the music therein is a bit more Past-Electronica than Modern-Electronica so it’s not lackluster as I was expecting. I can hear influences ranging from City and Color, Chet Faker, Depeche Mode, Karnivool and If These Trees Could Talk. Most of the music is straight up EDM but much of it contains theatrical into, outros, building musical segments and a lot of musical angulation. The lyrics aren’t as annoying or sickly as I thought they would be. Vocals by Jacob Acosta are pretty straight forward as he commands a somewhat complex tonal registry all the while maintaining impressive finesse and control. Acosta melds and blends all of the above together in a starkly unique way. The end result? A new sound with an old classic feel. Reading from the words of other reviewers during my research this is a consensus.

How shall I sum up the sound of HYTS for you? How about stimulating to the mind, body and soul. While actually sounding like he’s not so over produced like some of the more modern sounding artists out there like Panic! At The Disco and Zeds Dead, HYTS manages to capture a sound that is old yet surprisingly fresh all at the same time. Trust me when I say there are legions of fans waiting for these guys to arrive. Many of these tracks sound surprisingly fresh and innovative, which makes up for their somewhat dated influences. They way they blend familiar 90s trademark House layers in songs like “We Are” and the switch up to pretty dope and trippy melodies like “Synthesize” where Acosta vocals, especially in the chorus, reminded me to A-ha’s Morten Harket.

All songs will cause you to reflect on your own life experience through the keen wisdom of HYTS’s music, vocal mojo and lyrics. The Musicianship from all involved is World Class and the productions strokes are Professional grade. In conclusion there are 3 things I really like about “Exoplanet”. For one I didn’t want to shoot myself with my pen like I do with most bands from the Bay Area these days so no worries there. Two: this CD may be the most impressionable, genuine, artistic CD I’ve heard this year. HYTS only two members accomplish what a bunch of producers and songwriters can’t and they have the courage to write and play music the way they want to. A far cry from the “sell out” corporate puppet bands causing the masses to scratch their heads.

Whereas 90% of the bands could care less about this approach as they just want to make labels happy. This is one of the most important attributes for me when reviewing music. “Exoplanet” by HYTS has no serious weaknesses or flaws and is exactly what the title says it is a compelling musical journey of sorts through the musical roots of a brilliant producer and a singer songwriter.

BVANDCAMP: https://hyts.bandcamp.com/track/exoplanet-2

Lucas James

Sam Baker – Land Of Doubt

Sam Baker – Land Of Doubt

YOU TUBE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VwJt3mqfi5o

Following a European tour behind his new album, Land Of Doubt, Sam Baker is turning his attention to creative projects in 2017: Opening his first-ever exhibition as a visual artist, staging an original play and filming a documentary. As you may know, Sam has limited hearing after being on a bus that exploded during a 1986 terrorist attack in Peru, but he’s from Texas, now living in Austin.

This is an artist with much storytelling to do as a songwriter, and it seems there is no end to what he can tell from his life’s perspective. Some of it comes out on this album with no question, but it has a lot to offer musically speaking too. But you don’t get this impression right away, as it takes getting beyond the first track “Summer Wind” but make sure to get back to it, because it’s actually-a great piece once you’ve heard the rest of the album. “Some Kind Of Blue” is where you instantly get right into Sam Baker’s songwriting and playing prowess. So, it all starts to get interesting pretty-swiftly either way.

Make no mistake about it, he still has a good ear for his music, and he wrote a great song here, delivered with everything he’s got. Survival is key and this track seems to help close some personal doors, or at least it appears that way. “The Silvered Moon” is an instrumental with the piano getting a work-out, which goes into “Margaret” with a song about living on the red and blues sides of a certain woman. It goes well with the following two tracks, “Love Is Patient” and the lesser but not least “Leave” which make sort of a trifecta of tunes together. They’re a few steps worth taking to get to the rest. With each offering a little something to enjoy about them.

“The Feast Of Saint Valentine” is one of the biggest tracks, with more going for it than most, without getting away from the thread of content, being lighthearted for the most part. He tells a story well and this is no exception to that rule. You really feel his passion on this track, as it intensifies throughout. And the same thing happens with “Moses In the Reeds” with a little humor thrown in for good measure. It’s good to hear some sense of humor, if even about a pretty-concerning socio-political subject. I was reminded of an old song by Jim Croce when I first heard this. And I love the how the guitar solo is done. It’s one of the better tracks on the album and certainly one of my favorites.

“Say The Right Words” takes some getting used to, just as the opening track does, but once you come around, it’s all good. This just takes the more musically traveled path with the saxophone solo making it really shine for all it’s worth. “The Sunken City Of Roses” is a string instrumental that is par excellent in every way. The only thing it needs is more minutes attached to it. “Peace Out” is a very cool sentimental song that hangs in there with the best of the album. If you go with the flow you’ll get to “Where Fallen Angels Dwell” and find another gem waiting for you, as-long as Sam Baker is up your alley by now. And that will lead you to the “Land Of Doubt” which is what it’s really all about.

AMAZON: https://www.amazon.com/Land-of-Doubt/dp/B072R73TDM

Elvin Graham

bd Gottfried

bd Gottfried

URL: http://www.bdgottfried.com/

In 2017 – bd Gottfried is an edgy, uncompromised writer releasing his 8th solo album entitled: Through The Dog’s Eyes – produced by Juno Winner Siegfried Meier. With airplay in over a dozen countries he continues to work in an unrestricted style with lyrical depth that will always take you on a journey.

Having a varied working background as a touring musician and session player. Working in the past with a vast array of artists such as Pino Palladino (Pete Townsend, John Mayer Trio). Breen Laboeuf (Celine Dion, April Wine). Greg Dechert (Bad Company, David Gilmour), to name a few. There really is too much to go into his background without dropping a lot more names, but if you just listen to any of his albums you can hear he’s of the same ilk as those he’s been working around all these decades. Through The Dog’s Eyes is drenched in quite the retro attitude with ongoing modern techniques from which it is also based. It takes you through the late 70s to the current landscape using everything that has come with it. You will find everything from hard to soft rock, along with techno aspects that keep it fresh and vibrant. One thing is clear by it all, and that is he is a force to reckon with.

It starts out smoothly with “Something You Weren’t” having an esoteric feel once the drums piledrive their way in through the intro and he gets past the first verse and into the chorus. This is rock ‘n roll but in the lighter, more pop laden sense. There is no absence of everything 80s here, but with a matured finish to it. The way he brings the old and new sounds together is excellently played. There is a backbeat to this that won’t quit, with the drums playing a strong role in the whole song. This is one of three tracks that take the cake for their extraordinary efforts in songwriting and playing shops. Another track worth a big mention is “Blame It On The Money” because it has the biggest sound of them all and it gets my vote for one of the said three tracks that take home the prize. This isn’t just some run of the mill cut, it’s fantastic in every way. It edges most of the other tracks because it musically and lyrically verges on perfection. If you want everything the artist can bring, this is where you’ll find it. The lyrics make it what it is, but not without a solid tune behind it. There’s a benchmark here and this song reaches it and then some. You feel the influences but also the originality that make this a great song. These influences range anywhere from David Bowie to Elton John and even some King Crimson can be detected, as well as Roxy Music, XTC Brian Eno and even some Eric Clapton. It doesn’t get much wider than that. “Eye Of Time” encapsulate all of them and more, with Todd Rundgren getting his influence in there. And those are only the highest of the high points to describe what the album has going for it. The latter being the most interesting and musically adventurous but not necessarily in front of the pecking order. The rest is supremely-sublime to go along with these awesome tracks.

NAPSTER: http://us.napster.com/artist/bd-gottfried/album/through-the-dogs-eyes

John Birch

Seconds Before Landing is back

Seconds Before Landing

URL: http://www.secondsbeforelanding.com/

Seconds Before Landing is the brainchild of musician John Crispino. In the year 2010, Crispino began writing music for a progressive rock concept album, that was finished and released to critical acclaim in 2012. That album was titled The Great Deception, and it produced not only a hit song, but also a video that has been viewed by hundreds of thousands worldwide, with excerpts being used by news organizations from around the world. That track is titled “Welcome, To The Future”, and features King Crimsons’ Trey Gunn. Also appearing on that album, was legendary bass player, Tim Bogert from Jeff Beck fame. And that’s a whole lot of background with so many songs on an album to cover. Jumping ahead to said album released in June, 2017, it’s entitled: Now That I Have Your Attention, and it’s thought provoking in a multitude of ways that not only tend to deceive at times, but also thrill the rest of the time. The second outing from Crispino comes with a whole new set of players to go with a few he already been playing with. Most notably being guitarist Eric Maldonado who does a spot-on job throughout these twelve concept pieces that you can either listen to in full as recommended, or skip around to your desire.

If skipping around you can find the more musical tracks to sink your ears into if the talking and whatnot about the UFO factors is what they’re after. It goes both ways but should be heard in full the way it plays out, which would take up more space than this review allows. So, it goes down in skip around fashion, as mentioned. The best thing to do is pick the most satisfying cuts and let the concept play out once wind of it gets around enough to take it however you may. It covers an assortment of musical styles including some electronica, smooth jazz and hard rock, all seamlessly blended and mastered by Andy Jackson who worked with Pink Floyd. The apple simply doesn’t fall far there.

It does sound like Pink Floyd on many of the tracks, but if that is a bad thing then Dark Side Of The Moon stopped selling decades ago. And that simply is not the case. But while it resembles them a lot it also passes the torch, and that’s looking on the bright side of the whole subject. But if you really want to nail the concept influence it goes more to The Pros And Cons Of Hitchhiking or Pink Floyd’s The Final Cut before anything else. These are all great things in which to be measured by, so it’s no skin off this band to follow in such footsteps and make some of their own while they’re at it. As for the songs, they run together in succession and comes with all kinds of titles like “4 A.M.” with its contagious aura which also lends to the UFO concept, “Wandering Soul” and “You’re giving Me A Headache.” All of which are excellent in every way, including any spoken word between them as they all contain some of one of the other or both. There is plenty of killer guitar, keys, horns and big vocals to keep it interesting, and some of both the heavy and light varieties of rock, including electronic dance music bit here and there. But they progressively rock out, and that is the difference on this fantastic concept album.

FACEBOOK: http://facebook.com/sblmusic

Larry Toering

Charles Boyd

Charles Boyd

URL: http://charlesboyd.org/new-albums.php

Charles Boyd’s music and background can all be found at his website, with his latest free release, Crypt Kicker, now available for download. This, like most of his music, is adult contemporary with a comedic twist of the mature variety. But that that doesn’t mean he’s always mature about it. You’ll have to take that with the musical strides he continues to make as he goes, with some of that being also left to the bad and good which can be taken from it. This Canadian artist has been through his share of experience, but a health issue brought him out of the public eye and give his music comical away with no hesitation.

Not everything is a joke with Charles Boyd, and he proves that with several of the songs on his latest album, and proves exactly the opposite as well, which is how he primarily presents himself anyway. It might not be your taste or sense of humor that comes with, but it’s not all fun and games either. You just have-to hear him out in-order to get the balance he brings to the table. And that might even be another reason he offers it up for free, for not cost at all. The best thing to do is search it up and find out for yourself, but a few pointers could help and could guide you to all angles of his art.

Crypt Kicker contains twenty songs, some of them more like chants, but kicks off comedically if you see it that way, with “The Lustful Dead” which has him singing about sex after death. But it’s worth mentioning, again, that Charles has gone through some health issues and his music is part of his healing process. You either sympathize or not, but it could be part therapy for all anyone knows. This album has a horror theme to it, as it opens with “The Lustful Dead” and you have no choice but to either laugh or skip the whole thing. It won’t do any good to hear the rest if you don’t take the time to listen to the lyrics and decide for yourself.

Once the second track gets underway, you already see through it enough to continue, especially if you’re not new to his free catalog. Then you’re already used to this side of him and know what to expect. If that is the case, you’re in good shape listening to his latest work. But even then, “Friends In New York” does entice as if it’s not going to be one of the funny cuts. But it turns out much like the opener once it’s over. The next few follow in the same fashion, all lean on the comedic side of the album which runs like an experimental concept. But if you listen to them all, a few slice-through as very positive.

“Irresponsible” is the first of the cleaner numbers, but also still a funny one with some of his weed humor shining through, which is obviously a prescribed thing in his case with nothing but good intentions behind the hilarious lyrics. “British Columbia” is another one, but it’s less interesting with more of a romantic approach. “House Of Weed” needs no explanation either, so there’s a lot to chew on if you don’t like every word he’s singing about. “Outrageous” is another one of the more positive numbers which gives it a good mark, but most of the tracks are explicit and sexually naughty to say the least, so, keep this way from the kids and have a laugh if it’s your type of humor. Check out the rest of his work as well.

I-TUNES: https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/charles-boyd/id494796969

Elvin Graham